Thieves vandalize government cars assigned to Department of Statistics

News coming into Bahamas Press confirms robbers have broken into several government-registered vehicles assigned to the Department of Statistics.

According to a our investigations, sometime early this week, “sticky finger” rogue bandits smashed the windows of several cars parked in the parking area of the Clarence Bain Building and peeled off the decals from those government cars.

Sources believe the decals are being used by the culprits to paste on stolen cars riding around the city that are unlicensed and perhaps are a part of many of the robberies in the capital.

BP is calling on transport officials to examine these cases and move quickly to implement modern technology in registering vehicles to reduce threats of lawlessness on our streets.

We wonder when the Road Traffic Department will discontinue the handwriting exercise on decals, which has fed corruption within the department. All cars on the streets of the country should have a barcode on plates and an automatic digitally printed decal issued! Having a digital database of registered vehicles on the streets makes our streets safer from criminals and makes unregistered vehicles easier to spot at roadblocks.

One vehicle with two thieves recently went free through a roadblock as the bandits had hitched one license number at the front of the car and another number to the back.

Criminals are still moving around in this town and failure to upgrade the licensing system is at the heart of the problem.

Millions of dollars have vanished from the accounts of the Road Traffic Department since the days of Papa Clown and to this day no one has been arrested. We wonder why?


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re-negotiate - Keod Smith

Keod Smith is a Barrister in The Bahamas practicing at Commercial Law Advocates, Trinity Place Nassau.

He served as a Member of Parliament for 2002 – 2007 and as Ambassador for the Environment and Chairman of the BEST Commission from 2002 to mid 2006.

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